Massive Arsenal Stolen from Bucklands Beach Home. Operation Unification Opens with a Bang in NZ. No Lessons Learned From Napier Siege?

What exactly does a suburban home in Bucklands Beach need with a massive gun cache and 5,000 rounds of ammunition?

The burglary comes on the eve of Operation Unification*, an Australasian-wide two-week campaign aimed at encouraging the public to report those who hold firearms illegally.

Would you feel safe knowing a. your neighbour was legally tooled-up so close to a primary school, b. his stash was so insecure and c. someone nicked it all with impunity during ‘broad daylight’?

Here’s the haul stolen yesterday : (Source) Note, Waller Avenue is on the corner with Bucklands Beach Primary School.

“Police say the burglars broke into the home, on Waller Avenue, some time between 9am and 5pm through the rear ranch slider (ed. patio door).

They loaded what is thought to be a white truck with more than 15 firearms, including:

•Caesar Guerini” (brand)

• 1 x Forum 12 guage field gun

• 1 x Forum 12 guage sporter impact

• 1 x Elipse Evo 20 guage field gun and another 28 guage barrel

• 4 x semi automatic shotguns

• “Browning” (brand)

• 2 x 12 guage, 2 shot semi automatic (1966)

• 1 x Browning 20 guage semi automatic 5 shot shotgun

• 1 x Winchester Martini Actim .22 collection gun

• 1 x Remington 30/30 lever action collectors gun

• 1 x Remington 1187 Camo 12 guage semi automatic shotgun

• 1 x Parkerdale Safari 30-06 rifle

The suspects also took 5000 rounds of shotgun ammunition, and left behind a crow-bar and trolley jack.

A police spokeswoman said the owner of the guns and property had all the right firearms licences and security mechanisms — including safe storage — in his home.

“Everything that should have been in place, was in place. The firearms were legally within that property.”

She added that the owner was not under investigation.

It was possible that the firearms could be sold on the black market.

“There are so many different avenues, many different options, and we’re working through those at the moment.”

A number plate, EAL626, was located at the top of the driveway. It appeared to have been ripped off a vehicle. This plate was cancelled on December 28, 2013.”

Update 19 June 2014

Police are warning firearms owners to keep their guns locked away after two guns were stolen from a Dargaville address on 16 June.

About 2.30pm the owner of the property returned home to find that his house had been broken into and two guns and some jewellery had been stolen.

The guns, which are described as a 12 gauge shot gun with 30 inch blue barrel and a camouflage semi automatic a 12 gauge shot gun, had not been locked away.

Northland Police Operations Manager Inspector Marty Ruth says firearms owners must lock their guns away as required by the law.

“Firearms that aren’t safely stored are at risk of falling into the hands of criminals.”

Yesterday an Australasian wide two-week campaign, aimed at encouraging the public to report firearms in the possession of unlicensed holders, began.

…Mr Ruth says the Dargaville burglary is a timely reminder to keep guns safe from burglars.

We are concerned by the number of firearms we find when executing search warrants and we need to get illicit firearms out of the hands of criminals for the safety of everyone in the community.”

Mr Ruth says anyone who possesses firearms is required by law to hold a licence, so if people know anyone who holds weapons without a licence then they should report it…” more here

 

Napier Siege gunman was licenced

The Bucklands Beach arsenal is three weapons less than that collected by ‘Napier siege‘ gunman Jan Molenaar. That included include two short-barrelled pump-action shotguns, two semi-automatic rifles and a revolver.

Molenaar had held general and collector’s firearms licences but he was one of the 50,000 whose licences expired in 2002, 10 years after the government got rid of lifetime licences in favour of a 10-year renewable system.”

“Applicants for a standard licence must be at least 18 years old and provide two references. Those applying for further endorsements allowing them to own military-style semi-automatic rifles or pistols require two further references. The process must be repeated every 10 years. source

At at conservative estimate there are about 1.1 million firearms in legal ownership in New Zealand. Today there are a few less. NZ police estimate that 950 firearms are stolen every year.

* Operation Unification opened in Tasmania where only 179 firearms had been stolen this financial year. Read more http://www.themercury.com.au/news/tasmania/tasmania-police-officers-aim-to-recover-states-stolen-firearms-as-part-of-operation-unification/story-fnj4f7k1-1226882038131

 

 

9 thoughts on “Massive Arsenal Stolen from Bucklands Beach Home. Operation Unification Opens with a Bang in NZ. No Lessons Learned From Napier Siege?

  1. Just a note to the admins that you don’t seem to be able to post comments on the latest Arun Kumar story, I tried twice.

  2. “Arsenal” is indeed an accurate description. Many of those weapons would be illegal here in Australia, particularly the semi-automatic shotguns, they’re ideal for massacres and armed robberies. They’ll probably turn up sooner or later.

    “Police say the burglars broke into the home, on Waller Avenue, some time between 9am and 5pm through the rear ranch slider”. “Rear ranch slider”???No alarm?? oh jeeeez! Insurance?

    Plinka, plink,plink plink,plink….plink!

    • Notice how police were eager to state that the owner

      “had all the right firearms licences and security mechanisms — including safe storage — in his home” ?

      Can’t have been that “right” could they. Doesn’t exactly inspire confidence, or it there a degree of arse covering going on here?

      • The “security measures” required to have a firearms licence in New Zealand are very minimal. One merely needs to have a gun tied to something like a furnace to meet the requirement.

        I am very “pro-gun”, but I detest the redneck moron mentality that exhibits a cavalier attitude towards firearms. The Kiwis are too careless to behave themselves responsibly. One hears many news stories about an errant hunter that accidentally shot someone purely through their own negligence.

        • I don’t have any ideological bias in regard to guns one way or the other, my wife and I owned a farm in SE Australia– firearms were simply “tools of trade”.
          I’ve also used semi-automatic shotguns, they’re extremely dangerous weapons. I agree with Admin, that one individual was allowed to acquire and store, such an arsenal, is appalling–the fact that it appears to be legal is irrelevant.

          I doubt that Kiwis are necessarily dumber than any other nationality, we’re all capable of making a single (lethal) mistake. Certainly some people shouldn’t be allowed to use firearms, in my opinion, some people shouldn’t be allowed to drive either.

          • I respectfully have to disagree with your assessment. Kiwis are, on average, significantly dumber than other nationalities. Generations of removing the top 10-20% of every generation through emigration and leaving behind the most stupid, dishonest, and parasitic has created a society of the bogans, by the bogans, and for the halfwit and cunning bogans that rule them.

            Here is a great example of how Kiwis do when put to the test. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10860452

            Incidentally, I scored 95% despite having never lived in Australia. The only question I failed was the one asking the colours of the Aboriginal flag. The test is so elementary that one must truly be an imbecile to score the average of what Kiwis score especially given that the Australian immigration agency that runs the test distributes a guide telling one what is on it. Kiwis (and Aussies to a large extent) do not like competition because it shows how useless most of them are.

            I proudly own firearms whose sole purpose is to kill people. I am not a violent person and, in fact, I am a vegetarian partly on ethical grounds. However, one needs to have the ability to defend oneself from crooks.

            I do not like idiots having guns, but the notion that the state, who incidentally has perpetrated the most violence of any entity in the world, should monopolise force and set limits on how many firearms one should own is ludicrous. Psychological tests show that the police forces attract a disproportionate number of people with serious psychological disorders and often transform stable people into monsters. Why should these people tell us who may or may not own guns?

            People in countries such as Finland or Switzerland own them responsibly. The problem is that one cannot be a responsible gun owner, but rather, that too many bogan Kiwis cannot do it.

            1. You’ve made generalisations about Kiwis (and Australians) I’ve never lived in NZ so I won’t make similar comments, and any discussion about Australians in Australia is OT on this site.

            2. I realise that a discussion about gun control in principle, is OT here, however, I can’t help remarking that, in my opinion, the idea that owning firearms will protect an individual from state oppression is a complete fantasy. It’s an 18th century ideology that’s well past its use-by-date.

          • My point is that gun violence and crime are symptoms of a greater problem, which exists in the culture and society that produces the violence. Some societies have widespread firearms ownership yet low levels of crime and gun violence whereas other societies seem incapable of containing violence (e.g. New Zealand, parts of the United States). Firearms are merely an instrument that helps perpetrate violence rather than its cause.

          • Yes, gun control advocates keep forgetting that it’s not guns per se that are the problem. It’s the people whose hands they fall into. The percentage of people owning guns in Switzerland is very high. But they are a rational, peaceful people. In the same way that democracy doesn’t suit every society, gun ownership laws might not, either. (I’m pro-gun ownership as well, after too many brushes with criminals). Guns in the hands of artisan cheesemakers look a lot safer to the rest of us than guns in the hands of dope-addled inbred adventure sports enthusiasts.

Comments are closed.