Kiwi Caught Hammering Chilean Calves To Death, 1.5 Million Unwanted Calves in NZ

Kiwi company Manuka's "waste products" in Chile

New Zealand’s barbaric calf killing practices have caught international attention after a video was made of Kiwi farm hand slaughtering calves at Manuka’s Chilean dairy farm.

Rather than selling calves for raising by other farmers, New Zealand allows its farmers to bludgeon unwanted calves to death.

And not only is it totally legal in New Zealand, they’ve been trying to establish this practice in Chile – except the locals want no part of it..

Some New Zealand farmers also induce abortions in their pregnant cows to ensure they all come into milk at the same time. Any surviving calves are either hammered or knifed to death. Induced abortions are also legal in New Zealand.

Calf killing prevents the young from drinking the highly valuable colostrum, or first milk (something to think about if you’ve ever considered using it as a supplement). The waste product is then burned, buried or sold for pet food. Nice thought?

A Chilean news program got hold of the video and published an expose on this barbaric New Zealand farming practice.

Discretion is advised when viewing this film. A translation of it has been provided below.

Translation provided by SafeFromNewZealand

Title: Video confirms killing of calves at Manuks dairy company

Video Commentary

New incidents emerged after the report made by the 24 Hours Chronicle (Name of News Channel or Show). This is one of the videos that shows animal abuse of calves on the property of the farm Hacienda Coihueco Administration belonging to New Zealand firm Manuka.

Report: One of the calves that falls from the tractor’s cart is still alive. Apparently, the calf is a newborn and it struggles to stand up. A few seconds pass before the man returns. Look at the tool he is holding in his hand

The situation is exactly as described by the worker who reported the story to 24 Hours.

Worker: “They would hammer it (calf) on the forehead. The one that died was lucky because otherwise someone would hit it again.”

Report: These are the graves described by the worker who reported the killings.

Worker: “It is sixty metres long, almost two metres wide, and three or four metres deep. If someone goes by the ditches, it is not possible to see the ditches because they are on the edge of a small creek”.

more dead cows

Reporter: “Are those ditches in the plant where the milk comes from?”

Worker: “Exactly, it is right on the property.”

Reporter: “And so the buried calves are right next to where the dairy plant on the property?”

Worker: “Yes, they are nearby. The ones that are farthest away are 400 metres away.

Report: The images were filmed a few months ago and it is currently not possible to find these bodies in the interior of the property. The man seen on the film was identified by the prosecutor as the former manager of production at Manuka and a New Zealand citizen.

Prosecutor : “We charged him, but we were learned that he was fired last Friday, that is to say on the 24th and on the 27th he left the country via the Arturo Benitez International Airport and it was also confirmed to us by the police.”

Juan Carlos Petersen (General Manager of Manuka): “We want to reaffirm our complete commitment to transparency with respect to animal treatment and we strongly reject any actions to the contrary.”

Report: The MP Fidel Espinosa asked the Public Ministry to investigate possible business links that might exist between current Regional Director Isaac De Los Lagos with Manuka and other dairy plants the south of Chile.

The prosecutor continues to pursue judicial action against Manuka. In that respect, it is possible that charges will be laid against those responsible for obstruction of justice.

Prosecutor: “The investigation into animal cruelty and the killing of calves is not finalised nor because Mr Ward’s departure from the country.”

Juan Carlos Petersen (General Manager of Manuka): “Those involved are no longer with our company. What was discovered relates not only to people that betrayed our company and its trust, but also betrayed the values that underpin Manuka as outlined in its internal policies and procedures.

Report: According to the prosecutor handling the case, the firm helped coordinate the departure out of this country of the man shown on the film (story ends prematurely).

New Zealand’s TVNZ also picked up this story. The beanie-wearing hombre in the video is a Waikato man going by the name of Zach Ward.

Ward used to be a production manager for Manuka, owned a Waikato farm and had also worked for Fonterra.

Kiwi dairy company Manuka paid the man caught on camera beating a calf to death more than $130,000 after the video emerged.

Waikato man Zach Ward worked for a Manuka-owned farm in Chile, but left after an investigation found he was breaching animal welfare regulations.

In Chile farms are required to euthanise calves with a lethal injection…

ONE News has discovered that the company privately paid Mr Ward more than $130,000 after tax in bonuses after his actions were exposed.

A copy of the exit agreement between Mr Ward and the Chile branch of Manuka, signed after he was dismissed for beating calves, shows he was paid in appreciation for services he offered to the company.

Among payments he received was a bonus of more than $70,000, a voluntary payment of $38,000 and more than $5000 for airfares.

Good to know that Chile’s animal welfare standards are higher than New Zealand’s. Lethal injection probably isn’t used in NZ because

a). the cost – a hammer to the skull is a lot cheaper than poison.

b). a paid vet would be needed to administer the injection.

c). it is not the ‘Kiwi way.’

Hypocrites

New Zealanders were up in arms a few years ago when dozens of seals were clubbed to death on Kaikoura’s beaches, yet millions of calves suffer the same fate and no-one turns a hair? That’s all about to change.

Kudos to the Chilean farm workers that went on strike recently. One of their grievances was that they were traumatised at having to euthanize live full-term calves and those born following induced abortions. Its reassuring to know that compassion and respect for animals still trumps corporate greed in some countries.

NZ’s dirty little secret

As with most things in New Zealand, only the shame (and potential financial loss) generated by international condemnation has generated calls for the law to be changed.

Last month we wrote about how there were calls in 2010 for calf killing to be banned in New Zealand. Hans Kriek from SAFE said

“No one actually realises what we do in this industry and how cruel it actually is. “New Zealand could seriously pay a price  over this, so it’s really in the dairy industry’s own interests to stop this practice.” source

SAFE’s Many Carter reckons an estimated 1.5 million calves are the unwanted ‘by product’ of the dairy industry, and says that the Ministry for Primary Industries allegedly only has 10 inspectors for the whole of New Zealand.

It might mean bludgeoning them on the farm, it might mean sending them off to the slaughterhouse, but they’re worthless to them,” Carter said.

Further regulation was needed through legislative reform to monitor issues around animal welfare, as the present approach was “absolutely ridiculous,” she said.

“I guess there’s two issues. There’s the welfare of calves on the farm, and is it being monitored, which we know it’s not because MPI, Ministry for Primary Industries, has only 10 inspectors for the whole country which is absolutely ridiculous.

“The second issue is the dairy industry cruelty as a whole, the inherent cruelty in the industry which can’t be resolved.”

Bobby calves killed at a slaughterhouse often did not fare better than those killed on the farm, picked up at four days old and transported distances of 100 kilometres or more to be slaughtered, Carter said…” more here

Feel strongly about this abuse and inhumane treatment? the answer is in your hands – stop buying New Zealand dairy products.

You can follow SAFE NZ here http://twitter.com/SAFEnewzealand

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4 thoughts on “Kiwi Caught Hammering Chilean Calves To Death, 1.5 Million Unwanted Calves in NZ

  1. Here is the translation:

    Title:

    Video confirms killing of calves at Manuks dairy company

    Video Commentary

    New incidents emerged after the report made by the 24 Hours Chronicle (Name of News Channel or Show). This is one of the videos that shows animal abuse of calves on the property of the farm Hacienda Coihueco Administration belonging to New Zealand firm Manuka.

    Report: One of the calves that falls from the tractor’s cart is still alive. Apparently, the calf is a newborn and it struggles to stand up. A few seconds pass before the man returns. Look at the tool he is holding in his hand

    The situation is exactly as described by the worker who reported the story to 24 Hours.

    Worker: “They would hammer it (calf) on the forehead. The one that died was lucky because otherwise someone would hit it again.”

    Report: These are the graves described by the worker who reported the killings.

    Worker: “It is sixty metres long, almost two metres wide, and three or four metres deep. If someone goes by the ditches, it is not possible to see the ditches because they are on the edge of a small creek”.

    Reporter: “Are those ditches in the plant where the milk comes from?”

    Worker: “Exactly, it is right on the property.”

    Reporter: “And so the buried calves are right next to where the dairy plant on the property?”

    Worker: “Yes, they are nearby. The ones that are farthest away are 400 metres away.

    Report: The images were filmed a few months ago and it is currently not possible to find these bodies in the interior of the property. The man seen on the film was identified by the prosecutor as the former manager of production at Manuka and a New Zealand citizen.

    Prosecutor : “We charged him, but we were learned that he was fired last Friday, that is to say on the 24th and on the 27th he left the country via the Arturo Benitez International Airport and it was also confirmed to us by the police.”

    Juan Carlos Petersen (General Manager of Manuka): “We want to reaffirm our complete commitment to transparency with respect to animal treatment and we strongly reject any actions to the contrary.”

    Report: The MP Fidel Espinosa asked the Public Ministry to investigate possible business links that might exist between current Regional Director Isaac De Los Lagos with Manuka and other dairy plants the south of Chile.

    The prosecutor continues to pursue judicial action against Manuka. In that respect, it is possible that charges will be laid against those responsible for obstruction of justice.

    Prosecutor: “The investigation into animal cruelty and the killing of calves is not finalised nor because Mr Ward’s departure from the country.”

    Juan Carlos Petersen (General Manager of Manuka): “Those involved are no longer with our company. What was discovered relates not only to people that betrayed our company and its trust, but also betrayed the values that underpin Manuka as outlined in its internal policies and procedures.

    Report: According to the prosecutor handling the case, the firm helped coordinate the departure out of this country of the man shown on the film (story ends prematurely).

  2. The longer I observe NZ from a distance the more ashamed I am to have come from there. From people’s attitudes to each other to their attitudes to animals, the UK is far more civilised.

  3. Well, if they sell calves to other farmers, those farmers might cut into their profits. Can’t have that! I read elsewhere about some Kiwis whose cat-killing beliefs (based on the fact that domestic cats kill wild birds) made them unpopular on a cat-loving French island. The world’s finding out, very slowly, about actual Kiwi attitudes. How long can you spin an image? Only as long as the material fatigue cracks start showing because the spinning’s so hard.

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