Would You Vote For A New ‘Migrant Party’?

Patsy Wong’s resignation has resulted in a March by-election having to be held in the Botany constituency, where migrants make up more than half of the voters.

Rather than use a mainstream party to make the Chinese migrant voice heard in parliament action was taken to form a New Citizen Party.

The New Citizen Party aims to represent Chinese New Zealanders and has a focus on economic and law and order issues. The party has been organised by Auckland businessman Paul Young, former New Zealand Labour Party list candidate Stephen Ching, and Chinese businessman Jack Chen. The party is registered by the Electoral Commission, making it eligible to contest the party vote.

The membership of the new party is not just Chinese New Zealanders but also people in the Korean, Maori and Pakeha communities.

Last August Paul Young told the Herald that he believed that as New Zealand became more engaged with the rest of the world, “we do need to listen to different voices”. He also said ithat the new party will have “a focus on community safety, legal and education issues which required long-term policies, “and we do not see that happening“.

Given the large number of migrants living in Botany this is an excellent idea. As long as migrants from other countries are properly catered for it has a good chance of success. Its time for immigrants to have their own voice in parliament, they could effect some real changes in the way that New Zealand Inc.  is run.

Could this be the beginning of the end for the ‘Kiwi Way’ ?

Will trade/professional bodies be made to get together with the immigration service and adopt identical requirements? It would be good if migrants didn’t get all the way to NZ (an expensive process) only to find out they can’t get a job because their qualifications aren’t recognised. There are far too many lawyers and engineers driving taxis.

There could be more effective anti-discrimination laws, why put Kiwis first when there’s supposed to be a skills shortage in the country and the population is in decline? There should be a level playing field for all.  Is it such a radical concept to fill a job on merit, rather than accident of birth or ‘who you know’?

The New Zealand Herald’s headline says the new party faces an uphill struggle – looks like the status quo may be feeling  a nipping at their heels. But here’s the news for them – migrants are used to an uphill struggle in NZ.

If the new party gathers power, as  it will unless sabotaged, there are other communities in New Zealand that have high proportions of migrants that may want to follow the lead and put forward their own MPs.

It wouldn’t take much – perhaps 5 or so MPs to make a difference to the balance of power in New Zealand, and in an election year that’s going to cause some buzzing in the Beehive.

Would you give a New Citizens Party your vote?  if only to encourage the faint winds of change that are trying to blow away the cobwebs in New Zealand?

It will be interesting to see how seriously this ‘threat’ to the established order is taken. If a dirty tricks campaign is waged against the new party it could be seen as desperate move to prevent change in New Zealand.

Expect to see a lot of dirt digging in the coming weeks.

For the background to this story read this report in the Herald – New Migrant Party has an uphill struggle

17 thoughts on “Would You Vote For A New ‘Migrant Party’?

  1. P Ray

    But the nz i grew up in modest skilled people could get partners and buy houses that was the kiwi way.”
    Tell that to the people who buy up heaps of land and drive prices up… surprise, it’s NOT THE ASIANS

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/sunday-star-times/business/4619576/Government-policies-blamed-for-house-prices

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/property/news/article.cfm?c_id=8&objectid=10702056

    P Ray Is a blue collar worker a drunken yob in your opinion, so people without degrees are anti social. Tell me why women wont marry down and how the social fabric of society will be ok if blue collar tradesmen cant afford homes beacause women wont marry down.

    Why do asian people want to live in NZ when they look down at blue collar kiwis. Why such the obsession with status and prestege. And why cant I get a work visa for china so I can be a labourer and be a global citizen like everyone else its not fair.

  2. How many asian migrants who are highly skilled would welcome a pakeha truck driver into the family if he was warm and kind and tolerant.

    Kiwis fear asians because we feel they are classist and social snobs as are many kiwis. But the nz i grew up in modest skilled people could get partners and buy houses that was the kiwi way. Tell me in asian are non graduates accepted by the elite or would a labourer be able to marry an asian doctor etc. I think this kiwis are racist thing has some truth but also migrants should also question there classist attitudes toward blue collar kiwis. Migrants from asia are welcome so long as they will accept and be friends with blue collar kiwis and maoris etc and not just be part of university elitist cliques.

    • “How many asian migrants who are highly skilled would welcome a pakeha truck driver into the family if he was warm and kind and tolerant.”
      Well, those highly skilled Asian migrants are driving taxis or operating liquor stores in NZ.
      Seriously? I don’t think they’d mind.

      “Kiwis fear asians because we feel they are classist and social snobs as are many kiwis.”
      So you fear them, but even more so than the “many kiwis that are just the same”?
      I can feel the logic right there.

      “But the nz i grew up in modest skilled people could get partners and buy houses that was the kiwi way.”
      Tell that to the people who buy up heaps of land and drive prices up… surprise, it’s NOT THE ASIANS 🙂

      “Tell me in asian are non graduates accepted by the elite or would a labourer be able to marry an asian doctor etc.”
      If it was a Pakeha male labourer marrying an Asian female doctor, I don’t think there would be any problem. This is close to it: High school mathematics teacher marries actress: German-Indonesian beauty Maya Karin Roelcke, 29, is due to tie the knot on Aug 14 with Muhammad Ali Abdullah, 38, a Mathematics teacher of British origin at Alice Smith International School, Kuala Lumpur.
      If it was an Asian labourer marrying a Pakeha female doctor… do you have an example for me?

      “I think this kiwis are racist thing has some truth but also migrants should also question there classist attitudes toward blue collar kiwis.”
      Would this idea of blue collar include being offensive, drunk and violent? Because such people are not welcome, socially, anywhere. I often see this idea of “blue collar” mixed up with “earthy” meaning crude and behaving with no respect.

      “Migrants from asia are welcome so long as they will accept and be friends with blue collar kiwis and maoris etc and not just be part of university elitist cliques.”
      Do you think that the only people Asian migrants in universities in NZ mix with, are the elite? So, every Asian in university, is rich? Some of them, surprise surprise, come from NZ too. Since university entrance is much more open to people after the age of 25(or thereabouts), and even people in their fifties pursue higher education (and SURPRISE, have Asian friends), I have to disagree with your statement.
      While I was in university as well, there were quite a few racist jibes on campus… and are these the people you call part of the “university elitist cliques”?

  3. The New Zealand Chinese is not a united bloc as imagined by other kiwis. We are a pretty divided lot. The English speaking and educated Chinese from the commonwealth nations (chinese poms included) and the old NZ Chinese won’t have much to do with this new party. Nor the Taiwanese KMT types. It has too much ties with Red China. I would like you to be aware that some of us don’t quite like the new migrants from Red China. They are obnoxious, ill mannered and frankly uncouth.

    • Unfortunately, you (and by extension me), are going to be seen as a united bloc simply because
      1. it fits into an agenda to see every Asian as an “eternal foreigner”,
      2. despite non-Asian foreigners buying up more of NZ than Asians the Asians are “different enough” to be easily singled out and united against,
      3. rather than get annoyed at racism we talk about how “those new people from our country don’t have our breeding, we must pull up the ladder after us” and
      4. we want to be constantly seen as the “model minority” so never agitate for beneficial change.
      Remember what Martin Luther King said: injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere
      and also remember that if you expect people to treat you differently than others with the same complexion… they have to get to know you first, and then by saying that others with the same complexion are not worth getting to know, you essentially are contributing to the problem.

  4. Would be worth a vote if they want to seriously address migrant issues in New Zealand. But I will also say that some migrants like to “pull the ladder up after them” to ensure that people from overseas don’t get that same consideration. And then of course say “Oh, those new people from our country, they have no respect for this country.” (Others would call such people “Uncle Tom”)
    They fail to see how racism against new migrants can translate very easily into racism against migrant “New Zealanders” because many people take resumes at “face/name value” – why else would migrants change their names to get better job prospects?
    To end, I’ll leave with a quote by Martin Luther King: Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.

    • I know some of this people personally, they are the type that always complain of new migrants (like they weren’t immigrants themselves), they generally have been here for a number of years and think they fit in, but what I see is that instead of socialising with the Kiwis they form groups with other old migrants. These people also dreams of the “good old days in NZ” when Pakeha/Maori was the only face of NZ, and many hate to see any development, preferring the old fashioned rural NZ.
      Go figure.

      • Funny thing about the old days of Pakeha/Maori, and even now to a certain extent, the immigrant people talking about “the good old days” would actually hate those times… because it is exactly in those times that immigrants were shunned. I suspect they want the “good old days of exclusion” for other immigrants BUT excluding themselves… special treatment for the toady.

  5. No I would not vote for such a party. When I come to NZ I come to be a NZer. Either join in or go back where you come from.
    Also you need to get your facts straight.

    “There could be more effective anti-discrimination laws, why put Kiwis first when there’s supposed to be a skills shortage in the country and the population is in decline? There should be a level playing field for all. Is it such a radical concept to fill a job on merit, rather than accident of birth or ‘who you know’?”

    NZ’s population is not in decline. NZ’s population growth is one of the fastest in OECD.
    Nothing wrong with fill a job with ‘who you know’. Happens everywhere. I dont many chinese employing other ethnic groups in akld?
    Also ‘accident of birth?’ People who born in NZ belong here or dont they? I can go back to HK and get job when I want.

    • Thank you for your comments Peter.

      According to CIA World Fact Book NZ is 128 in the world for population growth. Within the OECD countries such as Ireland, Israel, Mexico and Turkey have higher rates of growth than New Zealand.

      You may wish to read the following information about population decline in New Zealand and bring yourself up-to-date.

      Births registered in the December 2009 year exceeded deaths registered in that year by 33,600, below the 35,200 recorded in 2008.

      Historically, natural increase has been the main component of population growth in New Zealand, but its contribution is set to decline gradually as the population ages and fertility remains stable. By 2026, natural increase is projected to be about 23,600 a year.

      Net gain from permanent and long term migration only accounts for 39% of the population growth. http://www.socialreport.msd.govt.nz/people/components-population-change.html

      Population decline can be readily fixed by increasing migration. New Zealand’s recent history shows that very little population growth comes from migration. This is unlikely to change in the future.

      The relationship between migration and population growth is complex. Migration may provide only short-term solutions to labour shortages or social needs unless migrants also bring their families, maintain a higher fertility on average than the local population, and settle permanently. On current projections, the number of immigrants required to significantly increase New Zealand’s population is much greater than has ever been sustainable historically. Migrants (who tend to be mobile) are more likely to move on if the local conditions do not fit their expectations, and migrants tend to have lower fertility than people in their source countries. Even if their fertility is higher than the recipient country, it tends to drop quickly to the local norm.

      This means that while high levels of immigration may quickly increase the potential wealth and skill base of the economic environment, people need reasons to settle permanently. Moreover, neither migrant settlement nor population decline is geographically even and the areas of need may not match the areas chosen as the places to settle. http://statistics.school.nz/sitecore/content/population/Home/tools-and-resources/getting-the-bigger-picture-three-common-misunderstandings.aspx

      After 2008, the economic situation has changed – but several things mean that we are going to have to rely on immigrants to fill skill shortages. One is the aging of the population. Those in the prime working age as a proportion of the population will continue to decline unless we supplement the numbers with immigrants. Secondly, our own skilled population tends to migrate elsewhere – along with Ireland, we have the highest proportion of our skilled workforce living overseas, even if outmigration has dropped significantly as a result of the global downturn (50% fewer went to Australia in 2009). And thirdly, we simply do not have enough appropriate applicants to meet labour demand in key sectors. The health workforce is a case in point. I recently attended a welcome held by a DHB for a group of new employees. Of the 30 who were there, 28 were immigrants http://www.omega.org.nz/News-Events/Blog-Spot/EntryId/6/Skilled-Immigrants-and-the-Auckland-Economy.aspx

      • Thank you for the information, however as you say births exceeded deaths by 33600, that is still growth and immgration account for ONLY 39% of growth, 39% is quite a lot!

        And “According to CIA World Fact Book NZ is 128 in the world for population growth. Within the OECD countries such as Ireland, Israel, Mexico and Turkey have higher rates of growth than New Zealand.” I dont think we should compare NZ with Mexico and Turkey.

        Also regarding this new party does it not create an “us verses them”? Politics should be about competing ideals not competing groups of people.

        • Peter the data shows that the birth against death rate FELL in 2009 by 1,600 compared to the previous year. That is a population in decline and one that is aging.

          The amount of immigrants needed to significantly increase NZ’s population is unsustainable and can’t be achieved. 39% is not enough, neither is a declining birth rate.

          Why shouldn’t we compare NZ with Mexico and Turkey, they are OECD countries too. Perhaps New Zealand can learn from them.

          As for “Us and Them” in politics are you suggesting that NZ should not have a Maori party?

          • I think I understand you now. You mean NZs pop. growth rate is declining even though it is still growing. Population does not decline until deaths outnumber births (like Japan) or emigration is greater than natural increase plus immigration.

            And you think endlessly increasing population is a good thing? Only cornucopian economists think that. A world with 9 billion people in 2050 may not be a great place to be in.

            Ok apologies for Mexico and Turkey. Sure there must be some good things learn from them.

            I think Maori party is less than ideal as we are all people and should work together for our ideals. However I do have some sympathy for Maori party as Maori are indigenous and NZ is there only homeland and only place where there culture exists

          • I see the PR machine caught up with you as well, Mr. Chian. The Maori aren’t indigenous to New Zealand. The Mori-ori were, and the Maori wiped them out shortly after they reached New Zealand. Along with the moa… and after that one wonders how the title of kaitiaki (nature guardian) can be applied to Maori then.
            Of course, the term used wasn’t slaughter or cannibalism, it was “integration”.

          • Peter, NZ is not the only country where Maori culture exists.

            For example, there’s Te Korowai Aroha, a Queensland based Maori organisation.

            http://www.facebook.com/pages/TE-KOROWAI-AROHA-BRISBANE/77460291449

            There’s a website called Maori in Oz with an associated Facebook page
            http://www.facebook.com/MaoriInOz

            But its not at all surprising to know that Maori are thriving in Australia when you consider there are more Maori (as a proportion of the NZ population) in Australia than there are in New Zealand. Which is remarkable since there are no special Maori assistance programes there. What does Australia offer New Zealand’s indigenous population that New Zealand doesn’t?

    • How long have you been here?
      You may want to become a NZder, but the “born and bred” Kiwis may think otherwise, as demonstrated by the rampant racism in this country.
      Give it time, and take off the rose-tinted glasses, probably one day you will see the true face of NZ and that may change your mind, hopefully it won’t be too late…
      Good luck.

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