Another Elderly Person Beaten Up In Own Home

Another elderly person has been beaten-up in his own home, this time in The Avenues, Tauranga, a town that is popular with retired people.

Police were called to the man’s home by a concerned relative. He is thought to be in his 80s, and has serious head injuries. He was taken to hospital today where he is now said to be in a critical condition. We wish him well and hope he makes a full recovery.

Two weeks ago a 93 year old grandmother, Gwendoline Samson, was attacked in her home in Papakura, but fortunately she managed to successfully fight off her assailant without suffering any major injuries but it was the second time she’d suffered such an assault.

Police have yet to catch the thugs who smashed the face of another Tauranga grandmother. 65 Year old Mary Loader was severely injured when a half full beer bottle was thrown at her from a passing car one morning. She was out picking fruit at the time and the attack was completely unprovoked. See Tauranga grandmother in coma after bottle attack.

Update:

Later news reports are that the injured man has died from his injuries and a man has been arrested. A homicide investigation is currently underway read more here. Our deepest condolences go out to the victim’s wife and family.

Update 30 June 2010:

“The man accused of murdering his father, David Tait, appeared in Tauranga District Court on Wednesday morning. Forty-five year old, Murray Tait, is now facing a charge of murder after his father was found bashed inside his 15th Avenue Home on June 22.” source

We’ve said before that one may judge the character of a society by how it treats the weak, the vulnerable, the most easily forgotten. Abuse of the young and the old is widespread in NZ and may not be such a great place for older people to retire in. Other recent attacks on elderly people include:

  • A 72 year old man left shaken and bruised after being robbed at gunpoint at his home in Beerescourt Rd Road, Hamilton
  • Lois Dear, 66, murdered and sexually assulted in her classroom at Tokoroa primary school
  • Retired teacher John Rowe, murdered by two teenage girls in his Opotiki home
  • An elderly couple who were hopsitalized after a home invasion in New Plymouth
  • An elderly man kicked to the ground and assaulted by a truck driver in Manukau
  • An 85 year old man badly beaten during a home invasion at his Bethesda Village retirement home in Wiri.
  • 86 year old Patricia Burrows was left with a fractured pelvis, cuts and bruises after she was mugged in a Christchurch shopping mall
  • Yin Ping Yang, 80, died following a savage attack during a home invasion in Manurewa East that lasted for several hours.


Advertisements

One thought on “Another Elderly Person Beaten Up In Own Home

  1. This is another example of the New Zealand government doing one thing and the people feeling the opposite about it. Here is an example. National is encouraging pensioners to move here, if they can bring wads of money with them

    http://www.gian.co.nz/nzretire.php

    But look at how the elderly are treated.

    There is rationed healthcare for them because they are no longer productive –
    http://www.ageconcern.org.nz/archive/article/119
    (also google the New Zealand Priority Criteria Project, which laid the foundations for the point systems and ways they evaluate who is “worth” a given treatment)

    They are lonely – and they cannot always bring relatives over to keep them company, because of tightened immigration restrictions.
    http://www.ageconcern.org.nz/mediawatch/volunteer-visiting-fights-loneliness

    Abuse and neglect
    http://www.agewell.org.nz/elder_abuse_and_neglect.htm
    That is not to say it does not happen in other countries. But to say that New Zealand is no different from the rest of the world. Other than being more remote and having a higher cost of living and high petty crime rate compared to the nations these pensioners deludedly flee from.

By making a comment you agree to abide with the comment guidelines. Newer comments are at the top.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s