‘Jobs For Kiwis’ Hits Orcharding Industry

Tough luck if you’re planning to fund a holiday in New Zealand by picking fruit. According to one article in the Nelson Mail orchardists in the region have been inundated with so many requests for work that they’ve been able to pick and chose who they employ.

Tourists are likely to get pipped at the post, firstly by Kiwis and then by people with experience in “hard, physical work.”

But amazingly, despite the recession and high numbers of unemployed New Zealanders, working holiday visas are still being granted with 19,264 being approved this financial year.

We wonder how many visitors are still paying for visas and then not finding work, should they be asking for refunds? The visas cost Brits £50 each – that’s the equivalent of a sweet and juicy £963,200 ($2 million) for the NZ immigration service. Nice little earner.

In July there was a news article published “Migrants groups push to end ‘hypocrisy’ (9 July) – new migrants still arriving but no jobs: “Migrant support groups will today ask the Government to stop letting migrant workers into New Zealandknowing full well there are no jobs for them“, and to commit to helping those already here and grappling with unemployment.”

In November the importance of immigration to the NZ economy was emphasised by the Minister of Immigration when he said: (link)

“It’s clear that government policy has to continue the focus on economic gains from immigration. “Significant achievements in the Government’s first year have included new Business Migration policies to reduce red tape and make it easier for a wider range of business migrants to invest in New Zealand, as well as improvements to the Recognised Seasonal Employer Policy.”

All well and good but where are the jobs for them? why take their money, let them in and then give the work to New Zealanders?

See also other posts tagged  with “Jobs for Kiwis

Today’s posts – click here

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